2017 | Month: | Volume:4 | Issue:2 | Page:61-68

Relationship of self-esteem with depression, anxiety, and stress among dental and medical students in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and relationship between self-esteem and depression, anxiety, and stress among dental and medical students in governmental and private colleges in Saudi Arabia.

Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 645 clinical and intern dental and medical students in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were recruited to assess their self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and stress. A self-reported questionnaire was used that included the 21-item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSES). Data were analysed using linear regression, t-test, and one-way ANOVA tests run with SPSS Statistics software.

Results: A significant inverse relationship was found between self-esteem and depression, anxiety, and stress. The prevalence of depression was high at 67.4%, anxiety was 79.7%, stress was 64%, and low self-esteem was 23.4%. Depression and stress were the highest among Saudis. Stress was higher among non-married and clinical year students than for married students and interns. Students with higher incomes had lower self-esteem. There was no significant relationship with regards to differences in gender, dental or medical studies, and governmental or private college students.

Conclusion: Low self-esteem is related to depression, anxiety, and stress. Among dental and medical students in Saudi Arabia, there is a high level of psychological distress, and a considerable percentage of students report low self-esteem. More interventional programs are recommended to help boost the self-esteem and psychological well-being of these students.





Abstracting, Indexing and Library Catalogued Information


Indexing in other databases in progress.